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Supporting the Bandstand

Published on Thursday, December 20, 2012 By Melissa Prycer
In 1974, the staff and volunteers of Old City Park built our reproduction Victorian bandstand, and since that time, it’s been a visual centerpiece of the museum. (/images/postimages/cl1979_0231.jpg) Candlelight 1979 One of our all time favorite “pretty” shots. By volunteer photgrapher Priscilla Killion For decades, it was the main image of our logo. (/images/postimages/ocp-pc-2871.jpg) It’s been an important part of various museum events and activities. A camp activity in 2005 Using the bandstand for its original intention–music! Our re-enactor friends have used it for their annual Civil War skirmish. A wood turning demonstration during a special event. A perfect spot fo ..

New Stories at an Old Hotel

Published on Friday, September 28, 2012 By Melissa Prycer
Since January, a team of top historians have been working hard on Dallas Heritage Village’s latest exhibit. Have I mentioned that these historians are still in middle school and high school? Over the past several years, the Junior Historians have completed several projects that have developed their historical muscles, which made them all the more ready for the challenges of the Worth Hotel project. Unlike our other projects, they had a wealth of primary sources to work with–census records, newspaper articles, and oral histories. Some of those primary sources didn’t exactly match up perfectly, so there was much discussion as we tried to get closer to the truth. Emily explained that process excellently a few weeks ago on her guest post for our blog. And that ne ..

The Hidden History of the Hotel

Published on Friday, August 17, 2012 By Melissa Prycer
Repair work on the rear of the Worth Hotel is almost complete. It has been a fascinating process, because we uncovered so much evidence about the history of the hotel. Like many buildings, most major changes, such as additions, were in the back. Each left evidence for our intrepid detective, or rather carpenter, and his curator sidekick to discover. The hotel that stands so peacefully in the museum today has had an exhaustingly complex life. The simple rectangle you see today started out as a smaller rectangle. Then it grew longer. Then it became the top of a T when a new wing was added. Then the back got a new porch. Then the back burned and they repaired it. Then it moved to the museum, but we only took the front part. This summer, we removed much of the siding to repair ..

It takes a Village. . .

Published on Friday, August 12, 2011 By Melissa Prycer
(/images/postimages/hotel.gif)What does it take to repair a historic structure that is a bit worn? In the case of the Worth Hotel, it took a village, a charitable foundation, a social services organization, three generous corporations, a self-taught carpenter who used to fix trolley cars, and an unemployed history major. The Worth Hotel was never intended to be a beautiful structure. Traveling salesmen looking for a place to stay did not expect much in the way of aesthetics. For the past few years, this humble structure has looked alarmingly bad. Siding fell off, and we had to cover the hole with black plastic, which is incompatible with Victorian structures. Paint peeled and wasps lived happily in the walls. Visitors helpfully pointed out the problems, as if we might h ..

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